Radio is dead

At least in our house. The FM radio in our car and the tuners around our home are never used. So, radio is dead. Or is it? I listen to huge amounts of audio content. Mostly as podcasts on my iPod but also as live streams on the internet. And what audio content? I listen to very interesting shows from the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation and some audio books.

What did you say? Audio content from the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation? Yes, the same stuff that they broadcast on FM, or radio as some people call it.

So, you listen to radio? No. Or, it depends. What is radio? The content or the transport technology or the reciever or all of it?

My point with this cunfusing rant is to emphasise that in some discussions we need to separate the content from the technology. I think that much of the fear that content creators see in these so called new media channels are completely irrelevant. When Bill Gates says the TV will be dead in five years it is important to discuss what he mean by TV.

In our home we have a huge LCD monitor connected to a computer in our living room. Is that a TV? If it is a big monitor on the wall it is a TV and if it is a small monitor on a desk it is a computer monitor? Most people would look at it and say that it’s a TV. Technically it’s a computer monitor.

In the media industry we need to understand what kinds of delivery platforms people want our content delivered through. FM, DAB, podcasts or all of them? Satellite, cable, terrestial, streaming or download? And we need to learn how to build business models on those platforms.

We don’t have to go around getting scared when people that don’t know what they’re talking about are saying that something that they don’t know how to define is going away in five years.

For me it’s about podcasts, streaming and download. If you’re there with your content and your business models you win. You win my attention and if you’re clever you even win my money.

Radio is dead

7 thoughts on “Radio is dead

  1. atle says:

    Can I get an AMEN, brother?

    Another good example would be tv shows (or serialized really long films) on DVD – a significant portion of US dvd sales (~10% last time I saw some numbers)

    Are you watching TV when you physically time-shift it, rather than taping/pvr’ing it? same show, same actors – but rather than sit or skip through commercials you pay directly.
    Great for HBO and Amazon / CDon / retailer – not so good for Norwegian TV2

    The main challenge with pure user selection is finding the content – how often do you look at new podcasts in iTunes or Podcastalley? Will we end up with only “connected” content, where A mentions B who then turns you on to C (how many YouTube users go beyond the top played videos and discover new potential hits?)

  2. Media Distribution Whales is dead.

    Another amen. But in case nobody hasn’t discovered it yet. The One stop Shop of Media aint happening any longer. The internet IS the shop. We are the Media Nomad Generation. If i was a media whale still aiming to be keep being a whale i would be worried.

    We like cool stuff and we know where to find it. And we find it a little here and there. Do we have to marry the mailman to get our mail? Nope. We subscribe to the stuff we like, why then only from one Publishing House? Why only from one Cable TV Distributor? Dear Media Giants: Pay attention to how we prefer getting our stuff and learn from that if you still think you can keep us interested. Now we even se Mobile Carriers think they can lock us in.. forget it , release us and maybe you will keep us…

  3. I can’t really remember the last time I scheduled to turn on a TV-channel to watch a specific show or movie. It was probably around Christmas.
    If I lived in the U.S., the above fact would be rather different.

    I watch three shows: Las Vegas, Scrubs and Prison Break. Those three shows are available on Norwegian channels (TV3, TV2 and TV3 again), but the release dates are too far behind.
    When I know something is out, I want it immediately – not in two months.
    But I must confess: I like the five minute wait before a show starts. It let’s me build up a slice of tension and excitement. Using a tiny white remote to pinpoint my AVI-file which contains the latest episode doesn’t give me that same satisfaction.

    I might be weird, old-fashioned or something like that. But that’s the way I like it. :-)

  4. Quote (Lars F):

    Dear Media Giants: Pay attention to how we prefer getting our stuff and learn from that if you still think you can keep us interested.

    Comment:

    As long as we have to pay to company’s like NRK, Get, ViaSat etc. they get their money. If we quit buying extra channels etc and can find “what we want” out on the net, then they are in trouble, but until then…. Money Talks!!!

    If you thing HTPC owner’s is the major customers, then think again! You can’t even buy a HTPC in the stores that have decent price and hardware!!!

    – Me! Being negative?????!!!!! Leave a comment!

  5. Olav says:

    As long as we have to pay to company’s like NRK, Get, ViaSat etc. they get their money. If we quit buying extra channels etc and can find “what we want” out on the net, then they are in trouble, but until then…. Money Talks!!!

    I can find what I want, when I want easy, free and fast on the net today. But if nobody pays for content, no one will produce it. So are the consumers in trouble?

  6. atle says:

    Media is listening?

    The “topic matter expert” in the Norwegian Media Companies Association (Fagsjef i MBL), Helge Holbæk-Hanssen is vocing some interesting thoughts on what this means for them as owners of the channels – and their tracking for use by advertisers (view/readership numbers, statistical rather than circulation), and are planning for a new “Media Index” by 2009 to get a better grasp of use as opposed to just channel

    Norwegians thinking out loud

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