The controversy around Heinrich Stammler

A while ago the NRK released a video on YouTube featuring an animated german trance artist. It’s a part of an animated TV talkshow that will air in Norway this autumn. A part of the humor is that all the characters are dressed like Donald Duck. Meaning that they have no trousers…

Link to video.

The video was featured on the front page of YouTube and got more than 33 000 views. But the american audience found it utterly disturbing, creepy and inappropriate. So, after a while enough users flagged it and it’s now behind the login wall. Very interesting that the good old Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation is more controversial than the general YouTube audience. This stuff will be aired on national television.

So, some people agree that this is kind of silly. Neodorian has a very valid video answer to the discussion:

Link to video.

Then, the fantastic people here at the NRK making the original video got Mr. Stammler back into the studio where he recorded a YouTube response himself:

Link to video.

I think this is an excellent example of how to utilize these new distribution methods and handling the fact that this is a world where you don’t have full control.

The controversy around Heinrich Stammler

You Tube vs. Boob Tube

Tomorrow there will be an article in the Norwegian newspaper “Dagens Næringsliv”. Written by… me, actually. One of the issues I bring up is the question of how the internet and the fact that advertisers now have their own distribution channel change some business models.

I’ll try to put up an English version of the article here tomorrow. Until then you should all read “You Tube vs. Boob Tube” over at Wired.com:

TV advertising is broken, putting $67 billion up for grabs. Which explains why google spent a billion and change on an online video startup.

Some peoples problems, other peoples possibilities.

You Tube vs. Boob Tube

U2 on UTube

Link to video on YouTube.

I’ve been busy lately, so for what I know this is old news. Anyway, it’s a good excuse for me to paste a U2 video into my blog. According to the YouTube profile a user called U2Official registered less than a day ago and have posted two videos. One have been removed again and the other one is the one you see here. U2 Live in Milan “With or without you”.

Interesting times…

U2 on UTube

More on the conversation and the content

Atle b has a comment on my article about the conversation society that deserves to be read:

Well, you’ve upped the ante – the Google count now stood at 54 – with three of the top five referring back here. How is that for instant visibility?

If you change the viewpoint slightly, there is already a term and a discussion – namely “conversational media” clocking over 56 000 hits. I view it partially as a spin-off from “participatory journalism” and other ways of saying user-generated content.

Which brings it back to your current topic of content – is it “content” when I say to my co-worker “Gee, it’s raining outside. Again.”? Does it become content if I post it to a MySpace page? Then how about if I type it in MSN? It is saved, it is visible and there are ads making it a commercial “channel”

The main problem I have with YouTube and MySpace is that they take ‘traffic’ from everyday actions, and make it into “The Next Big Thing”:

zapping the channels on the tv you can scan the 20 channels twice in five minutes – does that mean you have just had “40 video views”?

talking nonsense to a friend to pass time – is that debate and commitment?

Like Bruce Springsteen said – 57 channels and nothing on – so why not spend time mindlessly looking for that one great video on YouTube? While posting the best links to your friends MySpace page?

Having a blog and a couple of very intelligent readers is a nice thing…

More on the conversation and the content

Understanding a new channel

NBC have been distributing trailers on YouTube for a while. Mostly trailers that they also run on traditional TV. Then, they get some negative comments about being commercial in a medium like YouTube.

It’s of course possible to simply put traditional videos on YouTube, and even have great success doing so. If the content is good you have the possibility to reach huge amounts of viewers.

However, the interesting stuff happens when you really use this new medium. Lonelygirl15 is an example of something that we’ll see more of. Using traditional story telling, but in a typical YouTube wrapping and form.

It’s the same old story. “Oh, we invented TV. Let’s take some radio presenters and put them in front of a camera”… And 20 years later this new medium of television has evolved.

Maybe we don’t need 20 years this time. NBC gets the message and produce this excelent promo, only for YouTube.

Link to video.

The trailers from NBC on YouTube have resulted in more than 6 million views in total so far. The most popular is the exclusives, previews and of course this one.

(Thanks, Linn)

Understanding a new channel